CCL Text and Mods

A preview of the current CCL text can be found here:

CCL v0-68

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CCL Modules

CCL Modules are “add-on” packages of legal code that are optional for CCL members. Such “mods” compromise the “polycentric” nature of CCL.

CCL Mods are only enforceable upon those who choose to be under their jurisdiction, and they are only enforced by those CCL Enforcers that agree to enforce them. Some are moral (ethical) while others are practical (e.g., “regulatory”).

Currently, the following modules are being drafted:

  1. Intellectual property inclusions (copyright, patents, etc.).
  2. Nuclear weapons restrictions (moderate; mainly on production).
  3. Nuclear weapons restrictions (strict; on both production and ownership of potential production materials).
  4. AI restrictions (mainly with relation to autonomous weapons-management).
  5. Air pollution restrictions (moderate; mainly fluorocarbons, arsenic, etc.).
  6. Air pollution restrictions (strict; CO2, methane, etc.)
  7. Animal rights (strict; applies to wide range of animals and allows no killing whatsoever)
  8. Animal rights (moderate; applies to larger/intelligent animals and allows conditional killing, because of recognized homesteading and property rights of animals, but conditioned upon those of human beings).
  9. Best practices of accounting
  10. Best practices of plumbing
  11. Best practices of electrical utilities

Drafts of each module are schedule to appear early 2019.

2 thoughts on “CCL Text and Mods

  1. Shane Maness Reply

    In regard to this:
    4.1.3.1.1. Initiative (Force, 46 Duress, 47 Fraud 48 ).
    47…E.g., blackmail, extortion, holding gun to someone’s head and demanding that they injure another person, etc.
    Definition: “Blackmail” is a threat for purposes of compelling a person to do an act against his or her will, or for purposes of taking the person’s money
    or property.

    Would blackmail in the traditional sense (paying someone not to reveal damaging, but true, information) be coercive duress, as well?

    For this to be the case, then revealing damaging,but true, information about someone would have to be some sort of aggression, under the NAP.

    Can you clarify?

  2. CCL

    CCL Reply

    Well, I think that’s just it: the definition used right now is not “traditional” (not sure what you mean by this – I think you “in the popular sense”), so this theoretical situation isn’t much of an issue.

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