CCL Adds a New Member to the Board of Advisors

Stephan Kinsella (LL.M. King’s College London-University of London; JD, Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University; MSEE, BSEE, Louisiana State University) is a libertarian writer and patent attorney in Houston. He was previously General Counsel for Applied Optoelectronics, Inc., a partner with Duane Morris, and adjunct law professor at South Texas College of Law. 

A leading libertarian legal theorist, he is founder and Director of the Center of the Study of Innovative Freedom and the founder and Executive Editor of Libertarian Papers. His numerous publications include Against Intellectual Property (Mises Institute, 2008), International Investment, Political Risk, and Dispute Resolution: A Practitioner’s Guide (Oxford University Press, 2005; 2d ed. forthcoming 2019), and the forthcoming Law in a Libertarian World: Legal Foundations of a Free Society.

CCL Version .68 Has Been Released

Lots of little fixes and modifications:

  • Lots of formatting issues (italics, fonts, etc)
  • Revised section on easements, including conditions for abolishment.
  • revised footnote regarding duress of another’s property to include “AI entities” as well as robots.
  • Clarified general membership procedures and rules.
  • Clarified conditions for legitimate bail-out of a defaulted financial institution.
  • Added new section on “judicial guards” (similar to bailiffs) and their role in settling disputes.
  • Clarified conditions for judicial repeal.
  • Removed assertion that guilty party paying for legal fees is part of their sentence.
  • Clarified what it is adjudicators are paying for when pursuing a search/audit warrant.
  • Revised chronological requirements and majority rules for when jury and judge cannot settle on a verdict.

CCL Version .67 Has Been Released

  • This version implemented alot of the material from Ulex 1.1, including three portions regarding product liability, financial institutions, and contract law. Basically, ALI’s superior resources are used wherever CCL might potentially be deficient or simply says nothing in disputes – but only if those relevant portions don’t contradict CCL to begin with. Think of it as this: you’re building a house and have all the manufacturer’s specific materials to use. But you begin working and then realize something is missing. These portions in CCL basically say “go the lumberyard and get the standard materials, but only if they fit.” This prevents a huge amount of emendations for CCL down the road, and implements the best legal frameworks in existence without compromising CCL’s core (libertarian) principles.
  • A draft section on easements; it needs some work yet, but it’s generally in place.
  • Some procedures have been modified regarding settling disputes. Arbiters are required to implement “pendulum arbitration” when settlement through mediation fails – since it is the most effective procedure.
  • Also another caveat for arbitration: instead of going straight to subpoena if a defendant refuses to participate in arbitration for an aggression – aka by refusing to jointly choose an arbiter, they can choose to have their own arbiter choose with the plaintiff’s arbiter and third arbiter, who will then settle the case. This is a very effective method of judicial procedure since it mitigates arbitration bias.
  • “Addenda” are now “modules.”
  • Because of size, I also moved the entire definitions of “consent” to the chapter on contract law.
  • Also, provided an image of the degrees of consent (express – implied – hypothetical), and specific that CCL does not enforce hypothetical consent.